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Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and New York City Council Launch 2015-2016 Participatory Budgeting Cycle

Today, Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and New York City Council Members launched New York City’s 2015-2016 Participatory Budgeting cycle — the largest and fastest-growing Participatory Budgeting process in the United States.  This year, New Yorkers in 27 Council Districts will collaboratively decide how to distribute over $30 million to local capital projects through a year-long process of neighborhood assemblies, delegate meetings, project expositions, and community voting.

“The New York City Council is proud to lead the largest participatory budgeting process in North America, a truly grassroots and democratic tool that engages New Yorkers and invests in our communities. Participatory Budgeting enfranchises diverse New Yorkers — from immigrants with limited English proficiency, to young people, to lower-income workers —resulting in a civic dialogue that is truly inclusive. Last year, over 51,000 New Yorkers voted for locally-developed capital projects across the city, and we look forward to building on that resounding success in the upcoming 2015-2016 cycle. New York City’s Participatory Budgeting process is a model for empowered, community-based decision making across the country and around the world, and the City Council is proud to do its part to strengthen and innovate democracy,” said New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito.

Participatory Budgeting is a grassroots process through which community residents vote to directly allocate at least $1 million in capital funding per district toward proposals developed by the community to meet local needs.  Through a series of public meetings, residents work with elected officials throughout the year to identify neighborhood concerns and craft proposals to address them. Residents then decide which proposals to fund through a public vote.

Participatory Budgeting in New York City has expanded from four initial City Council districts in 2011 to 27 Council Districts for the 2015-2016 cycle. In 2014-2015, 51,000 New Yorkers voted to allocate $32 million dollars for locally-developed capital projects across 24 Council Districts in New York City.

The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University announced the New York City Council the winner of the Roy and Lila Ash Innovations Award for Public Engagement in Government, for its efforts to “engage residents from communities most often left out of traditional methods of public engagement.”

 2015-2016 Participating Districts:

 

Andrew Cohen

(District 11, Bronx)

Costa Constantinides

(District 22, Queens)

Robert Cornegy

(District 36, Brooklyn)

Laurie Cumbo

(District 35, Brooklyn)

Elizabeth Crowley

(District 30, Queens)

Mathieu Eugene

(District 40, Brooklyn)

Julissa Ferreras

(District 21, Queens)

David Greenfield 

(District 44, Brooklyn)

Corey Johnson

(District 3, Manhattan)

Ben Kallos 

(District 5, Manhattan)

Karen Koslowitz

(District 29, Queens)

Brad Lander

(District 39, Brooklyn)

Steve Levin

(District 33, Brooklyn)

Mark Levine 

(District 7, Manhattan)

Melissa Mark-Viverito

(District 8, Manhattan/Bronx)

Carlos Menchaca

(District 38, Brooklyn)

Daneek Miller

(District 27, Queens)

Antonio Reynoso

(District 34, Brooklyn/Queens)

Donovan Richards

(District 31, Queens)

Ydanis Rodriguez

(District 10, Manhattan)

Helen Rosenthal

(District 6, Manhattan)

Ritchie Torres

(District 15, Bronx)

Mark Treyger

(District 47, Brooklyn)

Eric Ulrich

(District 32, Queens)

Paul Vallone

(District 19, Queens)

Jimmy Van Bramer

(District 26, Queens)

Jumaane Williams

(District 45, Brooklyn)

Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and New York City Council Members Announce Results of the 2014-2015 Participatory Budgeting Cycle

Over 51,000 New Yorkers voted to allocate $32 million dollars for locally-developed capital projects across the city

New York—Today, Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and the New York City Council announced the voting results and winning proposals of the 2014-2015 Participatory Budgeting cycle. During the voting period of April 11th through April 19th, over 51,000 New Yorkers voted to allocate $32 million dollars for locally-developed capital projects across 24 Council Districts in New York City.

“The level of engagement and enthusiasm in this year’s Participatory Budgeting process was unprecedented and deeply democratic,” said Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. “Across the city, thousands of residents of all ages and backgrounds came together to make their neighborhoods a better place to call home.  Participatory Budgeting breaks down barriers that New Yorkers may face at the polls—including youth, income status, English-language proficiency and citizenship status—resulting in a civic dialogue that is truly inclusive and representative of the diversity of this community and this city.  I thank everyone who took part in this year’s process and helped make Participatory Budgeting a success.”

New Yorkers cast 51,362 ballots in the 2014-2015 Participatory Budgeting cycle. Approximately one in five ballots were cast in a language other than English.

According to preliminary findings from the Community Development Project at the Urban Justice Center, of Participatory Budgeting voters surveyed:

  • Nearly 60% identified as people of color
  • Approximately one in ten were under 18
  • Nearly 30% reported an annual household income of $25,000 or below
  • More than a quarter were born outside of the U.S.
  • Nearly a quarter reported a barrier to voting in regular elections, with one in ten reporting they were not U.S. citizens
  • 63% identified as female
  • Nearly 20% had a high school diploma or less (of those 25 years old or older)

Vote April 11-19

Participatory budgeting (PB) is a democratic process in which community members directly decide how to spend part of a public budget. In other words, the people who pay taxes decide how tax dollars get spent. Participatory budgeting helps make budget decisions clear and accessible. It gives real power to people who have never before been involved in the political process. And it results in better budget decisions - because who better knows the needs of our community than the people who live there?

This year, twenty-four Council Members are letting residents allocate part of their capital discretionary funds, giving the community real decision-making power over more than $25 million in taxpayer money.

 

Find your vote site, pledge to votesign up for updates, become a volunteer, or learn more about PB

Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and New York City Council Announce Expansion of Participatory Budgeting for 2014-2015 Cycle

Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and the New York City Council announced the expansion of participatory budgeting to 24 districts that will designate over $25 million toward locally-developed projects, proposals, and initiatives in the next budgetary cycle. 

The expansion more than doubles the number of participating districts and represents a nearly 80% increase in funding allocated for participatory budgeting from the previous fiscal year.

"Participatory budgeting is a gateway to greater civic participation and leadership in our communities, encouraging collaboration between residents and local elected officials to find creative solutions to neighborhood needs,” said Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito. “As we work toward a more inclusive, transparent city government, I am excited for 22 Council districts to take part in the participatory budgeting—more than doubling our participation from the previous cycle. This expanded process will give thousands of New Yorkers a hands-on role in making taxpayer dollars work for our communities.”

Participatory budgeting is a grassroots process through which district residents vote directly to allocate at least $1 million in capital funding toward proposals developed by the community to meet local needs.  Through a series public meetings, residents work with elected officials for a year to identify neighborhood concerns and craft proposals to address them. Residents then decide which proposals to fund through a public vote.

Good government groups hail participatory budgeting as a powerful tool to increase civic participation and community engagement. The only identification requirement is proof of residency in the district; voting in participatory budgeting is open to all residents 16 years of age and older, removing traditional obstacles to full civic participation such as youth, income status, English-language proficiency and citizenship status. 

Learn more about Participatory Budgeting and how you can get involved at http://council.nyc.gov/PB.

For the 2014-2015 cycle, the following Council Members are conducting a participatory budgeting process in their districts:

Participatory Budgeting Results 2014


Voters in East Harlem choosing which projects to fund with over $1,000,000.

Through Participatory Budgeting in New York City (PBNYC), New Yorkers are directly deciding how to spend millions of dollars of public funds every year. In the third annual cycle of PBNYC, residents across 10 NYC Council Districts came together to discuss ideas for improving their communities, and nearly 17,000 people voted on how to spend over $14 million. Here are the results:

  • District 5, Ben Kallos (Midtown East, Upper East Side, El Barrio, Roosevelt Island)
    RESULTS  |  Ballot
  • District 8, Melissa Mark-Viverito
    (East Harlem/El Barrio, Mott Haven, Highbridge, Concourse, Longwood)

    RESULTS  |  Interactive Map  |  Ballot  |  Videos
  • District 23, Mark S. Weprin (Fresh Meadows, Oakland Gardens, Queens Village, Glen Oaks, Douglaston, Bayside, Hollis)
    RESULTS  |  Interactive Map  |  Ballot
  • District 31, Donovan Richards (Arverne, Far Rockaway, Bayswater, Edgemere)
    RESULTS  |  Interactive Map  |  Ballot  |  Videos
  • District 32, Eric Ulrich (Rockaway Beach, Rockaway Park, Belle Harbor, Breezy Point, Broad Channel, Neponsit, Richmond Hill, Ozone Park, Woodhaven)
    RESULTS  |  Mainland Ballot  |  Rockaway Ballot

District 39 Neighborhood Assemblies

Come share your ideas for spending $1 Million to improve our community!

  • Monday, October 7th, 6:30pm
    P.S. 230 Upper School, 1 Albemarle Rd., Brooklyn (at McDonald Ave.)
    RSVP here
  • Thursday, October 10th, 6:30pm
    Old First Reformed Church, 729 Carroll St., Brooklyn (at 7th Ave.)
    RSVP here
  • Tuesday, October 15th, 6:30pm
    Carroll Gardens Branch Library, 396 Clinton St.,  Brooklyn (at Union St.)
    RSVP here
  • Wednesday, October 16th, 7:00pm -  Boro Park Assembly
    Georgia Ballroom, 4424 16th Ave, Brooklyn 45th St entrance
  • Friday, October 18th, 1:00-2:30pm - Senior Assembly
    Bishop Boardman Apartments, 1615 8th Ave.,  Brooklyn
  • Monday, October 21st, 6:30pm - Transportation Assembly
    Park Slope Library, 431 6th Ave. at 9th St, Brooklyn
    This assembly, co-hosted by NYC and District 39 transportation groups, will focus on livable streets and public transit issues.
  • Tuesday, October 22nd, 4:30-6:00pm - Youth Assembly
    Park Slope Armory YMCA, 361 15th St., Brooklyn
  • Wednesday, October 23rd, 7:00pm - Bangla Language Assembly
    Chittagong Association of North America, 545 McDonald Avenue, Brooklyn
  • Saturday, October 26th, 3-5 pm - Spanish Language Assembly
    Fifth Avenue Committee, 621 Degraw Street, Brooklyn 
Can you help us get the word out? Click here or below to download and print a flyer that you can share with your neighbors!

District 39 Assemblies

District 23 Neighborhood Assemblies

September

  • Thursday, September 19th, 7pm
    Hillside Manor: 188-11 Hillside Avenue, Holliswood, NY 11423
  • Monday, September 23rd, 6pm
    Fresh Meadows Library: 193-20 Horace Harding Expy., Fresh Meadows, NY 11365
  • Monday, September 30th, 11am
    SNAP Senior Center: 80-45 Winchester Blvd., Queens Village, NY 11427

October

  • Thursday, October 3rd, 7pm
    Cross Island Y: 238-10 Hillside Avenue, Bellerose, NY 11426
  • Tuesday, October 8th, 8pm
    Public School 18Q: 28-35 235 Court, Queens Village, NY 11427
  • Tuesday, October 15th, 7pm
    Bayside Senior Center: 221-15 Horace Harding Expy., Bayside, NY 11364
  • Thursday, October 17th, 6pm
    Queensborough College Lecture Hall, 222-05 56th Avenue, Bayside, NY 11364
  • Monday, October 21st, 7pm
    Towers on the Green, 272-48 Grand Central Pkwy. Floral Park, NY 11005
  • Thursday, October 24th, 7pm
    Samuel Field Y Tel Aviv Room (1st floor), 58-20 Little Neck Pkwy. Little Neck, NY 11362

For more information or to RSVP contact Yuridia Peña at yuridia [dot] pena [at] council [dot] nyc [dot] gov or 212.788.6984

Can you help us get the word out? Click here or below to download and print a flyer that you can share with your neighbors!

Assembly Flyer

Vote Results - District 44

2013-14

Number of Voters: 1,222
Amount Allocated: $1,120,000
Sample Ballot 
Winning Projects:

  • Uprgades at Midwood, Mapleton and Ryder Brookly Public Library Branches-- $200,000 (623 votes)
  • Street resurfacing in Boro Park -- $300,000 (596 votes)
  • Street resurfacing in Midwood -- $300,000 (511 votes)
  • Beautify the blocks of Boro Park by planting 100 trees -- $170,000 (443 votes)
Additional Projects that will be funded:
  • Street resurfacing in Bensonhurst -- $150,000 (413 votes)
Projects that have won funding in previous years:  list view  //  map view

 



2012-13

Number of Voters: 1610
Amount Allocated: $1,000,000
Winning Projects:

  • Security cameras in Boro Park - $200,000 for 8 locations (1,109 votes)
  • Countdown clocks in Boro Park - $200,000 for 10 intersections (1,056 votes)
  • Security cameras in Midwood - $200,000 for 8 locations (520 votes)
  • Countdown clocks in Midwood - $200,000 for 10 intersections (397 votes)
  • Countdown clocks in Bensonhurst - $200,000 for 10 intersections (392 votes)
Projects that have won funding in previous years:  list view  //  map view

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